Press Release

In recent years, city and local governments have increasingly used data to discover innovative new ways to improve their operations and serve their citizens. But the spread of these solutions between and within cities has been limited by obstacles including lack of replicability, resources, and technical expertise.

Press Release

The University of Chicago announced today that the National Science Foundation has awarded a $3.1 million grant to support the development of Array of Things, an urban sensing instrument that will serve as a fitness tracker for the city. Starting next year, 500 Array of Things (AoT) nodes will measure data on Chicago’s environment, infrastructure and activity to scientifically investigate solutions to urban challenges ranging from air quality to urban flooding.

Press Release

The explosion of data across disciplines has opened up vast new possibilities for scientific discovery. But many researchers do not yet have access to the advanced infrastructure needed to work with Big Data and realize its full potential. With new support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Globus can expand its mission to bring the advanced data management infrastructure used by massive science collaborations to small laboratories and individual researchers around the world. The foundation’s $500,000 grant will help Globus, part of the Computation Institute at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory, evolve from a free service to a sustainable non-profit model serving hundreds of thousands of resource providers, scientists, educators, and students.

Press Release

A Chicago-based consortium including the Computation Institute has been awarded $25 million over five years from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), an agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce, to establish a new center of excellence for advanced materials research. The Center for Hierarchical Materials Design (CHiMaD) will focus on developing the next generation of computational tools, databases and experimental techniques to enable the design of novel materials, one of the primary goals of the Obama administration’s Materials Genome Initiative (MGI). 

Blog

A vast amount of scientific knowledge is inaccessible to the scientific community due to the lack of computational resources or tools for small laboratories to share or analyze experimental results. With a new grant from the National Science Foundation, the Computation Institute will collaborate with leading institutions to look for ways that software can bring this data out of hiding, revealing untapped value in the "long tail" of scientific research.

The one-year, $500,000 planning grant enables investigators at the Computation Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, University of Arizona, University of Washington and University of Southern California to lay the groundwork for a proposed Institute for Empowering Long Tail Research as part of the NSF's Scientific Software Innovation Institutes program. Researchers will engage with scientists from fields such as biodiversity, economics and metagenomics to determine the optimal solutions for the increasingly challenging data and computational demands upon smaller laboratories.