Research Center

RDCEP brings together experts in economics, physical sciences, energy technologies, law, computational mathematics, statistics, and computer science to undertake a series of tightly connected research programs aimed at improving the computational models needed to evaluate climate and energy policies, and to make robust decisions based on outcomes.

Blog

Every year, scientists get better at modeling the Earth’s climate, making forecasts at higher resolution and further into the future than ever before.

Event
Anouar Benali, Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratory
October 15, 2015
The University of Chicago, Searle 240A, 5735 S. Ellis Ave., webcast via Blue Jeans

Title:  Quantum Monte Carlo for materials and Molecule; applications for HPC

Abstract:

Blog

The Array of Things, an urban sensing "fitness tracker for the city," hit two important milestones this summer as a pilot project launched on the University of Chicago campus and the effort received funding from the UChicago Innovation Fund and Argonne.

Blog

For 25 hours last weekend, the University of Chicago offices of the Computation Institute looked more like a lock-in party.

Blog

When it comes to studying climate change, most of the focus is on greenhouse gases that absorb radiation and warm temperatures at the Earth’s surface.

Event
Yan Feng, Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory
September 18, 2014
Argonne National Lab, TCS Building 240, Room 5172, broadcast via Adobe Connect

Besides Greenhouse Gases: Role of Aerosols in Climate Change

Blog

The prevalence of autism and autism spectrum disorders in the United States nearly doubled between 2000 and 2008, prompting much debate about the driver of this startling increase. Because the cause of these developmental disabilities remains largely unknown, scientists have looked at both genetic and environmental factors, as well as changes in clinical diagnostic patterns, to explain why autism spectrum disorders appear to be on the rise. In a new study published in PLOS Computational Biology, a team led by CI senior fellow Andrey Rzhetsky brought 100 million medical records to bear on this problem, using computational techniques to reveal strong evidence of an environmental influence on autism prevalence.

Blog

The future of cities doesn’t fit easily within disciplinary boundaries. Traditionally, urban research has been the domain of social scientists, while architects, urban planners, and policymakers implement academic findings into real practice. But the rising availability of city data and the computation to model and simulate the complexity of cities brings new scientists and partners into the mix, opening up new possibilities for understanding, managing and building cities. For the AAAS 2014 session, “A New Era for Urban Research: Open Data and Big Computation,” CI Senior Fellow and Urban Center for Computation and Data director Charlie Catlett assembled an “all-star cast” of social scientists, computer scientists, and representatives from government and industry to illustrate these new partnerships.