Research Center

The Urban Center for Computation and Data unites scientists from the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory with educators, architects and government officials to capitalize upon the

Inside the small wooden box are several tiny sensors, a cellular modem, a battery, and a micro-processor running custom programming code.

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For several years, “smart cities” has been a popular buzzword for applications of data, computation, and technology in an urban setting.

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Since its announcement last summer, the Array of Things (AoT) urban sensing project has been gradually refining its technology and strategy for its exp

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To encourage building owners to assess and reduce their energy usage, the City of Chicago passed the Building Energy Use Benchmarking Ordinance in 2013, requiring certain properties to report energy data. Late last year, that mandate produced the first Building Energy Benchmarking Report, containing insight and visualizations produced in part with the CI’s Urban Center for Computation and Data (UrbanCCD).

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For 25 hours last weekend, the University of Chicago offices of the Computation Institute looked more like a lock-in party.

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Last week, the Urban Center for Computation and Data unveiled the alpha version of Plenario, a new online portal for accessing, comb

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UPDATE: Array of Things has been nominated for the Cooper Hewitt People's Design Award! Vote here until October 6th.



Many people now wear wristbands or other devices to track their activity, giving them access to rich data about their daily routine that can help guide them towards healthier decisions and behaviors. The ambitious Array of Things project, led by the Urban Center for Computation and Data, seeks to create a similar bounty of data to better understand the environment, infrastructure, and activity of cities, creating a new public instrument for research, education, and applications that improve the lives of city residents.

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Cities around the world share common challenges: poverty, crime, education, environmental impacts, and health.

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The future of cities doesn’t fit easily within disciplinary boundaries. Traditionally, urban research has been the domain of social scientists, while architects, urban planners, and policymakers implement academic findings into real practice. But the rising availability of city data and the computation to model and simulate the complexity of cities brings new scientists and partners into the mix, opening up new possibilities for understanding, managing and building cities. For the AAAS 2014 session, “A New Era for Urban Research: Open Data and Big Computation,” CI Senior Fellow and Urban Center for Computation and Data director Charlie Catlett assembled an “all-star cast” of social scientists, computer scientists, and representatives from government and industry to illustrate these new partnerships.