06
Nov
2017

Two University of Chicago research groups will help build the pilot phase of an ambitious new National Institutes of Health initiative to make U.S. biomedical research data and tools accessible to more scientists.

25
Oct
2017

Like people, bacteria send out signals to attract and repel each other. New research by CI and Argonne scientists determined the molecular structures of a highly specialized set of proteins used by a strain of E. coli bacteria to communicate and defend their turf, a bacterial "social network" that could lead to new strategies for overcoming infectious diseases.

16
Oct
2017

On the World Health Organization’s target list for eradicating disease, hepatitis C is currently among the most wanted. An estimated 71 million people live with the viral liver disease globally, and 1.75 million new infections occur every year. Yet there is reason for optimism, as new treatments, preventative measures, and, perhaps soon, vaccines create novel strategies for driving down infection.

13
Oct
2017

With a $4.7 million grant from the National Cancer Institute, the University of Chicago’s Globus and leading cancer researchers at University of Chicago Medicine will build new protected cancer research networks that enable collaborations while keeping sensitive health data secure and private.

09
Aug
2017

Veterans will be the ultimate winners in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs-Department of Energy (DOE) Big Data Science Initiative, a collaborative research effort that casts Argonne National Laboratory in a prominent role. Argonne’s extensive track record of successes with big data and big computers make it the quintessential partner of this multi-faceted research team to improve healthcare for millions of veterans, advance supercomputing and solve some of the nation’s biggest scientific challenges. A team led by the Computation Institute's Rick Stevens, associate laboratory director for Computing, Environment and Life Sciences at Argonne, was instrumental in moving the effort from concept to reality.

26
Jul
2017

A new mathematical model of ecology created by University of Chicago scientists provides the most accurate reproduction to date of natural biodiversity, according to a new paper in the journal Nature. For almost a century, ecologists have conceptualized an ecosystem as the sum of pairwise interactions, such as predator and prey, herbivore and plant, or parasite and host. However, equations based on that theory failed to replicate the diversity and resilience of natural ecosystems. Building upon previous work that modeled competition between species as similar to a game of rock/paper/scissors, a team led by Stefano Allesina, Professor of Ecology & Evolution at the University of Chicago, found that adding additional competitors could generate stable and robust model ecosystems.

29
Jun
2017

As social networks, apps, and other websites become more adept at turning user data into personalized experiences, more frequent stories appear that highlight the exciting -- and sometimes disturbing -- implications of that technology for health.

19
May
2017

Two groups of Computation Institute researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory earned special awards from the office of the U.S. Secretary of Energy for addressing the global health challenges of Ebola and cancer.

04
May
2017

An international team of scientists including the Computation Institute has determined the 3-D atomic structures of more than 1,000 proteins that are potential targets for drugs and vaccines to combat some of the world’s most dangerous emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases.

01
May
2017

People have touted the potential of big data and computation in medicine for what feels like decades, promising more effective and personalized treatments, new research discoveries, and smarter clinical predictions. But only recently have these technologies made it to the clinic where they can actually improve patient care. At University of Chicago Medicine, several collaborations between physicians, researchers, and computational experts have produced such pioneering applications, from the pathology lab to the critical care wards.